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U-Visa

The U nonimmigrant status (also known as the U visa) is set aside for victims of crimes who have suffered substantial mental or physical abuse as a result of the crime and who are willing to assist law enforcement and government officials in the investigation or prosecution of the criminal activity.

To apply for a green card as a U nonimmigrant, you must meet the following conditions:

  • You have been physically present in the United States for a continuous period of at least 3 years since the first date of admission as a U nonimmigrant and continue to hold that status at the time of application for adjustment of status.

  • You have not unreasonably refused to provide assistance in the criminal investigation or prosecution

  • You are not inadmissible under section 212(a)(3)(E) of the Immigration Nationality Act

  • You establish your presence in the United States is justified on humanitarian grounds, to ensure family unity or is in the public interest

T-Visa

The T nonimmigrant status (also known as the T visa) provides immigration protection to victims of severe forms of human trafficking. The T visa also allows victims to remain in the United States and assist federal authorities in the investigation and prosecution of human trafficking cases. To apply for a green card as a T-1 nonimmigrant (principal), you must meet the following conditions:

  • You have been physically present in the United States for:

    • A continuous period of at least 3 years since the first date of admission as a T-1 nonimmigrant

    • A continuous period during the investigation or prosecution of acts of trafficking, and the Attorney General has determined the investigation or prosecution is complete, whichever period of time is less

  • You have been a person of good moral character since first being admitted as a T-1 nonimmigrant and until the decision on your Form I-485

  • You have complied with any reasonable request for assistance in the investigation or prosecution of acts of trafficking since first being admitted as a T-1 nonimmigrant and until a decision on your Form I-485

  • You would suffer extreme hardship involving unusual and severe harm upon removal from the United States

  • You are admissible to the United States as a permanent resident.

Extraordinary Immigrant Visa

The O-1 nonimmigrant visa is for the individual who possesses extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics, or who has a demonstrated record of extraordinary achievement in the motion picture or television industry and has been recognized nationally or internationally for those achievements. The O nonimmigrant classification is commonly referred to as:

  • O-1A: individuals with an extraordinary ability in the sciences, education, business, or athletics (not including the arts, motion pictures or television industry)

  • O-1B: individuals with an extraordinary ability in the arts or extraordinary achievement in motion picture or television industry

  • O-2: individuals who will accompany an O-1, artist or athlete, to assist in a specific event or performance.  For an O-1A, the O-2’s assistance must be an “integral part” of the O-1A’s activity. For an O-1B, the O-2’s assistance must be “essential” to the completion of the O-1B’s production. The O-2 worker has critical skills and experience with the O-1 that cannot be readily performed by a U.S. worker and which are essential to the successful performance of the O-1

  • O-3: individuals who are the spouse or children of O-1’s and O-2’s

Fiance Visa

If you are a U.S. citizen who wants to bring your foreign fiancé(e) to the United States in order to get married, you will need to file a Form I-129F, Petition For Alien Fiancé(e). This is the first step to obtaining a K-1 nonimmigrant visa for your fiancé(e). The K-1 nonimmigrant visa is also known as a fiancé(e) visa. You may be eligible to bring your fiancé(e) to the United States on a fiancé(e) visa if you meet the following requirements:

  • You are a U.S. citizen;

  • You and your fiancé(e) intend to marry one another within 90 days of your fiancé(e)’s admission to the United States on a K-1 nonimmigrant visa;

  • You and your fiancé(e) are both legally free to marry (this means you both are legally able to marry in the United States and any previous marriages have been legally terminated by divorce, death, or annulment); and

  • You and your fiancé(e) met each other in person at least once within the 2-year period before you file your petition. You may request a waiver of this in-person meeting requirement if you can show that meeting in person would:

    • Violate strict and long-established customs of your fiancé(e)’s foreign culture or social practice; or

    • Result in extreme hardship to you, the U.S. citizen petitioner.

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